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Full text of "Metropolitan transportation, a program for action. Report to Nelson A. Rockefeller, Governor of New York."

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Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library 
Gift of Seymour B. Durst Old York Library 



METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION 



-a ^/w^mm £0/1 actitm 



REPORT TO 

NELSON A. ROCKEFELLER 

GOVERNOR OF NEW YORK 

FROM THE 
METROPOLITAN 

COMMUTER 
TRANSPORTATION 
AUTHORITY 



FEBRUARY 1968 



AA 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/metropolitantranOOnewy 



TO: Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller 



On November 7, 1967, you requested this Authority to prepare a comprehensive 
plan and action program of transportation improvements for the New York State 
portion of the metropolitan region. 

In developing this report, we drew upon the resources of governmental and volun- 
tary agencies throughout the region. We wish to express our appreciation for the 
information and cooperation provided us by these agencies. MCTA assumes the 
responsibility, however, for the specific projects and recommendations set forth 
in this report. 

We present herewith a comprehensive plan and action program. 

The program is big. 

The program is "do-able." 

The program makes up for time lost. 

The program will meet present and future needs. 

We are recommending a two-phase program. The first phase represents a first 
priority system, complete in itself. It will cost $1.6 billion. The work on Phase One 
would be fully committed within five years and totally completed within ten. It can 
be financed from State Transportation Bond Issue funds, local contributions, public 
authority contributions and Federal aid. 

We are also projecting a longer range program — Phase Two — which is conceived 
as a logical extension of the Phase One priority projects. 

Phase Two will cost $1.3 billion and will further improve the region's transportation 
system. It would be financed, a decade or more from now, by Federal, State and 
local governments and by public authorities. By that time, the Federal share should 
represent the major portion of contribution. 

The total cost of both phases is $2.9 billion at current price levels. 

In recommending this program, we stress the urgency of starting Phase One this 
year. Unless major commitments are made now, unless construction is started 
promptly, pressing needs will not be met and costs will rise beyond our capacity 
to meet them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William J. Ronan, CHAIRMAN 
William L. Butcher 
Bruce A. Gimbel 
Eben W. Pyne 
William A. Shea 



SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS 



PHASE ONE 



We recommend the adoption of the following program for immediate trans- 
portation action: 

■ Rapid completion of the already authorized four-track tunnel under the East 
River between 63rd Street, Manhattan, and Long Island City, Queens, for ex- 
panded transit and Long Island Rail Road service. 

■ An additional high-speed express track for the Queens Boulevard subway to 
be constructed along the LIRR Main Line right-of-way for increased capacity and 
speed. 

■ A new transit line extending from the existing Queens Boulevard Line along 
the Long Island Expressway corridor to serve the growing areas of northeastern 
Queens. 

■ A new transit line extending from the existing Queens Boulevard subway along 
the LIRR Atlantic Branch right-of-way to meet travel needs of southeastern 
Queens. 

■ A new Second Avenue subway in Manhattan extending north from 34th Street 
to the Bronx, with connections at 63rd Street to Queens and West Side Manhattan. 

■ A new express transit line in the Bronx along the abandoned right-of-way of 
the New York, Westchester and Boston Railroad, connecting the new Second 
Avenue subway with the existing Dyre Avenue Line and the Upper Pelham Bay 
Line. 

■ A new 63rd Street crosstown subway, connecting the new East River tunnel 
with the new Second Avenue Line and the existing Sixth Avenue and BMT 
Broadway-Seventh Avenue subways. 

■ Extension of the Nostrand Avenue subway in Brooklyn along Flatbush Avenue 
to a modern terminal at Avenue U to serve the growing Mill Basin area. 

■ Extension of the New Lots Line in Brooklyn to a modern terminal at Flatlands 
Avenue and Linwood Street in the developing Spring Creek area. 

■ Purchase of about 500 high-speed, air-conditioned subway cars for operation 
on the new subway extensions. 

■ Expansion of yard and shop facilities to serve the new subway lines. 

■ Rehabilitation and re-equipment of the Staten Island Rapid Transit Railway 
from Tottenville to St. George. 

■ Construction of a spur of the LIRR to John F. Kennedy International Airport 
to permit dependable high-speed transportation between the airport terminal and 
Manhattan with connections at Jamaica for Brooklyn, Queens and Long Island 
points. 



■ Modernization of the Long Island Rail Road, including the purchase of 350 
new high-speed, multiple-unit cars; high-level platforms; track, signal and elec- 
trification improvements; yard and shop expansions; modernization of Jamaica 
Station and improvements at Penn Station and Flatbush Avenue Terminal; and 
extension of electrified service to Northport on the Port Jefferson Branch and 
Pinelawn on the Main Line. 

■ A new Metropolitan Transportation Center in East Midtown Manhattan, includ- 
ing a terminal for the LIRR linked to the 63rd Street tunnel; a terminal for high- 
speed rail access to JFK Airport; and a major interchange point for east-west 
movement of people via a new Central Business District distribution system. 

■ Modernization of the New Haven Railroad commuter service, including pur- 
chase of 144 new high-speed, multiple-unit cars; improvements to the signal and 
electrification system; construction of high-level platforms and rehabilitation of 
existing electric cars. 

■ Modernization of the Penn Central Railroad commuter service, including pur- 
chase of 130 new high-speed electric cars, construction of high-level platforms 
and extension of electrification to Brewster on the Harlem Division. 

■ Modernization of the New York portion of the Erie Lackawanna Railroad, 
including new equipment to meet immediate needs and a study of the feasibility 
of providing direct track connections to Penn Station. 

■ Development of general aviation airports as part of major transportation 
centers at Republic Airport in Long Island and Spring Valley in Rockland County. 
Also, development of a general aviation airport in northwest Westchester. 

■ Transportation centers at Pearl River and Orangeburg in Rockland County, 
and at Tarrytown and in the White Plains area in Westchester County. 



PHASE ONE IMPROVEMENTS 



CONNECTICUT 



TRANSIT EXPANSION PROGRAM 

New Rapid Transit Line or Extension 
Existing Line to be Rehabilitated 
Existing Junction to be Reconstructed 

RAIL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 

Existing Rail Line to be Modernized 

and Re-equipped 
Extension of Electrification Under Way 
Electrification to be Extended 
Rail Line to be Extended 



iiiiinmiii 



-H- 



/////> 



AVIATION AND TRANSPORTATION CENTERS 

Transportation Center 

General Aviation Airport ^r*- 
Extension of LIRR to JFK Airport MMtt 




SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS 



PHASE TWO 



We further recommend a continuing program beyond the first phase as follows: 

■ Extension of the Second Avenue subway from East 34th Street south along 
Water Street to serve the burgeoning lower Manhattan area. 

■ A new midtown distribution system along 57th, 48th, 42nd and 33rd Streets, 
using high-speed conveyors, small rail cars or other guided systems to link 
terminals, stores, offices, theatres and other CBD travel points. 

■ Extension of the new northeastern Queens subway to Springfield Boulevard. 

■ Extension of rapid transit service east of Jamaica and removal of BMT elevated 
in Jamaica business district. 

■ Replacement of the Third Avenue elevated in the Bronx with a new transit 
line adjacent to Penn Central Railroad right-of-way along Park Avenue. 

■ Extension of the Pelham Bay Line in the Bronx to a terminal in Co-op City. 

■ Extension of the Concourse subway to a modern transfer station at White 
Plains Road to serve the northeast Bronx. 

■ Purchase of 500 additional high-speed, air-conditioned subway cars for use 
on new extensions and to meet new travel demands. 

■ Additional improvements to shops and yards on extended systems. 

■ Continuation of transit improvements on Staten Island. 

■ Continuation of LIRR modernization program, including extension of electrified 
service to Port Jefferson, Ronkonkoma and Patchogue; additional high-speed 
electric and dual-powered cars; and further improvements to stations, track and 
signal systems. 

■ Extension of LIRR Brooklyn service to lower Manhattan. 

■ Continuation of Penn Central modernization, including extension of electrified 
service to Peekskill on the Hudson Division; modernization of the signal system; 
purchase of electric and dual-powered cars; and improvements to signals and 
track. 



■ A new railroad station at 149th Street, the Bronx, to provide convenient inter- 
change between the Penn Central and New Haven Railroads and the subway 
system. 

■ Additional general aviation airports on Long Island and in southwest Dutchess 
County. 

■ Transportation centers in Hicksville, Pine Aire and Ronkonkoma on Long 
Island; Brewster in Putnam; Beacon in Dutchess; New City and Suffern in Rock- 
land; and Goshen in Orange Counties. 



PHASE TWO IMPROVEMENTS 



CONNECTICUT 



TRANSIT EXPANSION PROGRAM 

New Rapid Transit Line or Extension 
Existing Elevated Lines to be Removed 

RAIL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 

Existing Rail Line to be Modernized 

and Re-equipped 
Electrification to be Extended 
Rail Line to be Extended 



///// 
4- + + + 



o 



AVIATION AND TRANSPORTATION CENTERS 

Transportation Center 

General Aviation Airport (TP***! 
Specific Site Not Determined 




LONG ISLAND SOUND 




ATLANTIC 



OCBA N 




REGIONAL NEEDS-TODAY AND TOMORROW 



The crucial factor for transportation in this region is the interdependence of 
city and suburb — the interdependence today, the even greater interdependence 
tomorrow. 

This whole great tri-state metropolitan region has 18 million people who live 
in some 13,000 square miles. 

By 1985, this region will have 25 million people. In other words, the region as 
a whole must absorb the equivalent of two Chicagos in less than two decades. 

The prospects, based upon the best available projections, are that the popu- 
lation growth will take place principally in the suburbs. New York City is not 
expected to grow much by 1985. Its dwelling population will redistribute some- 
what, however, with the outer areas of the city — Staten Island, Queens, parts 
of Brooklyn and the Bronx — growing, while the older areas closer to the core 
remain relatively stable in population. 

But it will be the suburbs that must absorb the greatest part of the increase. 

Population growth in the outer parts of the city and the surrounding counties 
will be complemented by a continuing rise in industrial development and new 
commercial sub-centers in these areas. This has important implications in terms 
of employment and transportation. 

By 1985, we will add more than 2.5 million non-agricultural jobs to the regional 
job market. Most of the growth in blue collar jobs will take place outside the 
central city area. Yet, the core area will continue to house a large proportion 
of the region's unskilled and semi-skilled labor pool. 

Thus, we are confronted with the need to use our transportation capability to 
better match people with job opportunities throughout the region. The concept 
of reverse commutation and the need for fast, efficient, low-cost transit becomes 
increasingly significant. 

In the core city area, the Manhattan Central Business District will continue to 
serve as a regional job magnet. White collar worker employment and associated 
service industry employment will increase faster than the relative decline in 
so-called blue collar or manufacturing employment in this area. 

Of the 7.8 million people gainfully employed in the region, 28 percent work 
in 8.6 square miles, comprising the Manhattan Central Business District. In other 
words, over two million persons work daily in an area as compact as Kennedy 
Airport. Here, too, the transportation implications are profound. 

The "office building capital of the world" brings to this region the greatest 
single concentration of managerial and business-professional talent ever assem- 
bled anywhere. Yet, its lifelines extend to the outer boroughs of the city and, 
importantly, throughout the entire region. Twenty percent of the CBD workers 
come from suburbia; 46 percent from the other four boroughs of New York City. 
These employees bring to the CBD their skills and talents; they take back with 
them the purchasing power that brings wealth, income and increased property 
values. 

To accommodate this growth in the CBD means the addition of 82,500,000 
square feet of office space by 1985. This is the equivalent of 55 more buildings 
the size of the Time-Life Building. To man this huge office complex and to serve 
it, we must make provision to transport growing numbers of people from the outer 
reaches of the city and the suburbs. 

The regional mix of jobs and workers, of population growth and economic 
development has heightened our interdependency. Each area within the region 
needs the other to grow and prosper. Significantly, the factor of mobility — the 
movement of people and goods — is the key to sustaining this. 

Our ability to get people to their jobs and goods to the marketplace is a 
fundamental challenge in a rapidly urbanizing society. This consideration is 
the underlying basis for this transportation report. 




The Transit Expansion Program 

The first priority or immediate action phase of the transit program includes 
construction of: 

■ new lines needed to relieve existing overcrowding, especially on the Queens 
Boulevard and the Lexington Avenue Lines; 

■ improvements to bottleneck terminals and junctions to permit existing lines 
to operate more efficiently; and 

■ rehabilitation of obsolete transit lines, such as the Staten Island Rapid Transit 
Railway. 

The second priority, builds on the first phase and makes further additions to 
the transit program. 

The estimated cost for the rapid transit expansion program is $961 million for 
the first phase and another $814 million for the second phase, totalling $1.8 
billion. 

New subways will be designed to meet high standards for fast and attractive 
service. To accomplish this, careful attention will be paid to alignment, grades, 



track work and the design of stations. New cars will be capable of high per- 
formance and speeds up to 80 mph. They will provide modern features for safety, 
speed and comfort including air-conditioning and other conveniences to satisfy 
modern travel demands. 



Rail Improvement Program 

The recommended rail improvements are designed to provide a modern, effi- 
cient transportation system to serve the journey-to-work needs of residents 
throughout the region; bolster the economic growth of the city and the surround- 
ing region; and offer an attractive and rapid alternative for a variety of travel 
needs. 

First priority recommendations heavily emphasize the need to replace anti- 
quated and slow rolling stock; improve power and operational facilities; extend 
electrification into growth areas; relieve bottlenecks for more efficient operation; 
and improve access to Manhattan's CBD. 

The second phase of development is based on extending high-speed electrified 
service into new growth areas; completing modernization work started under the 
first phase; and providing access to the lower Manhattan area. 

The estimated cost for the rail improvement program is $547 million for the 
first phase and $391 million for the second phase, totalling $938 million. 

The design specifications for new suburban rail service will provide us with 
a system without peer. The 100 mph multiple-unit cars currently under construc- 
tion for the LIRR will serve as a prototype for a new level of fast, comfortable 
and attractive service throughout the region. 



Other Transportation Improvements 

In addition to the major rail and transit improvements projected in this report, 
we are recommending expenditure of $157 million for Phase One transportation 
centers, aviation facilities and airport access. Our objective is to provide modern 
facilities to serve as major junction points for air, rail and highway travel. A total 
of $84 million is recommended for general aviation and for combined transpor- 
tation center-general aviation development of which $49 million is proposed for 
the first phase. 

As part of the program to improve coordination of transportation modes, we 
are urging immediate action to provide a high-speed rail link to JFK Airport. 
The estimated cost of this first priority project is $100 million. 



Regional Transportation Corridors 



In developing specific transportation projects and priorities, regional needs 
were considered in terms of transportation corridors as follows: 

Eastern Corridor Queens; Brooklyn; Nassau-Suffolk sectors 

Northern Corridor Upper Manhattan-Bronx; Westchester-Putnam-Dutchess 

(Connecticut); and Rockland-Orange (New Jersey) sectors 
Southern Corridor Staten Island sector 
Central Business District Manhattan, south of 63rd Street 

Within these corridors and sub-sectors, we are recommending improvements 
affecting rail, transit and other transportation facilities totaling almost $3 billion, 
as follows: 



(Cost Estimated in Millions of Dollars) 



Eastern Corridor 
Northern Corridor 
Southern Corridor 



Phase One 
$ 806 



Phase Two 
$ 533 



Total 
$1,339 



Central Business District 



428 
25 
406 



294 
10 
441 



722 
35 
847 



$1 ,665 



$1,27 8 



$2,943 



EASTERN CORRIDOR 




EASTERN CORRIDOR 






PHASE 
ONE 


PHASE 
TWO 


RAIL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 


Existing Rail Line to be Modernized 

and Re-equipped 
Extension of Electrification Under Way 
Electrification to be Extended 
Rail Line to be Extended 


1 1 1 I 
'////. 


-W44 


AVIATION AND TRANSPORTATION CENTERS 

Transportation Center 
General Aviation Airport 


o 


o 




General Aviation Airport 

Specific Site Not Determined 
Extension of LIRR to JFK Airport 




10 



15 



20 



MILES 




EASTERN CORRIDOR BROOKLYN-QUEENS SECTOR 





PHASE 


PHASE 




PHASE 


TRANSIT EXPANSION PROGRAM 


ONE 


TWO 


RAIL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 


ONE 


New Rapid Transit Line or Extension 






Existing Rail Line to be Modernized 




Existing Junction to be Reconstructed 


"ET 




and Re-equipped 




Existing Elevated Line to be Removed 






Rail Line to be Extended 










Existing Station to be Modernized 




AVIATION AND TRANSPORTATION CENTERS 


Extension of LIRR and JFK Airport 





PHASE 
TWO 



20 




New East River tunnel at 63rd Street will provide high-speed service and new access to Manhattan 
lor subway trains, upper tracks, and LlRR, below. 



21 



EASTERN CORRIDOR 

DESCRIPTION OF PROJECTS 



PHASE ONE 



Cost 

Transit Expansion (minions) 

63rd Street Tunnel Queens Connections $45 

The new 63rd Street East River tunnel will provide the capacity needed for ex- 
panded rapid transit service in the Queens sector of the Eastern Corridor. It will 
reduce overcrowding on the Queens Boulevard Line, the 53rd Street tunnel, the 
Flushing-42nd Street Line and the 60th Street tunnel. Together with new branch 
lines, there will be faster, more frequent and more direct subway service to the 
outer sections of Queens not now directly served by rapid transit. 

The connection to the present Queens Boulevard subway will permit the full 
coordination of existing IND services with the proposed added services. It will 
be constructed along 41st Avenue. 



Additional Express Track for Queens Boulevard Line $70 

This single high-speed express track will double express rush-hour capacity and 
permit Queens Boulevard trains to run non-stop from Forest Hills to Queens Plaza, 
thus freeing the existing tracks for additional trains. The track will be constructed 
economically along the LIRR right-of-way between Forest Hills and Queens Plaza, 
and will feed into the 53rd Street route at Queens Plaza. A second connection 
to the 63rd Street tunnel is also recommended. 



Northeastern Queens Line $150 

A new two-track northeastern Queens Line will branch from the Queens Boulevard 
subway in the Elmhurst-Woodhaven Boulevard area and extend along the Long 
Island Expressway corridor to the Queens College-Fresh Meadows area, pro- 
viding direct service to this intensely developed section for the first time. Located 
in this corridor are several high-rise apartment developments including Lefrak 
City, Fresh Meadows, Pomonok Houses and Electchester, as well as several large 
schools including Queens College (24,000 students) and St. John's University 
(13,000 students). 



Southeastern Queens Line $100 

A two-track southeastern Queens Line will be extended from the Queens Boule- 
vard Line at Van Wyck Expressway and Hillside Avenue. A short connection will 
be built to the LIRR Atlantic Branch which the new route will follow as far as 
Springfield Boulevard. Two new tracks will be added to the LIRR right-of-way 
for transit purposes. A station will be built adjacent to the LIRR Jamaica station 
for interchange of passengers between LIRR, subway and JFK Airport trains. 

This line will serve areas of southeastern Queens remote from subway lines, 
such as the large-scale housing development at Rochdale Village. Travel times 
to Manhattan and other parts of Queens will be significantly reduced. 



22 EASTERN CORRIDOR — PHASE ONE 



Cost 
(millions) 

Nostrand Avenue Subway Extension, Brooklyn $60 

The Nostrand Avenue subway, now terminating at an inadequate and inefficient 
station at Flatbush and Nostrand Avenues will be extended via Flatbush Avenue 
to a new, modern terminal at Avenue U. This extension will serve a growing area 
now remote from direct subway service. The construction of a modern terminal 
will reduce delays and improve operating efficiency. An important benefit will 
be to reduce travel time to this part of Brooklyn. 

New Lots Line Extension, Brooklyn $12 

The New Lots Line will be extended through or adjacent to the existing overhead 
storage yard to a modern terminal three blocks south of the present yard limits 
at Flatlands Avenue and Linwood Street. Although located in an area zoned for 
manufacturing, the new terminal will be architecturally attractive. This extension 
will provide better access to the housing, hospital, educational, industrial and 
recreational areas now rapidly expanding in the Spring Creek area of Brooklyn. 



LIRR CAR REPLACEMENTS PHASE ONE 




I.357 

Ipost 



WAR II 

Ipars 

PRESENT 



PHASE ONE 
PROGRAM 



Rogers Avenue Junction Reconstruction — 

In advancing the New Lots and Flatbush Avenue extensions, we recommend the 
removal of the bottleneck at the junction between the Nostrand Avenue and 
New Lots Lines at Rogers Avenue, east of the Franklin Avenue station. An ineffi- 
cient, awkward track layout, together with the need to cross trains in front of 
one another, now results in considerable delay at this point. Moreover, this 
junction restricts the capacity of the IRT lines in Brooklyn. The reconstruction 
of this junction to provide a grade-separated, smoother, more efficient junction 
is necessary to speed up Brooklyn subway service and to provide the capacity 
needed for full service to the Nostrand Avenue and New Lots Lines. This project 
could be included as part of the Transit Authority's continuing rehabilitation 
program. 

Additional New Subway Cars $28 

Approximately 200 high-speed subway cars will be required to serve the new 
extensions on the Queens - Brooklyn Lines. New cars will be capable of high 
performance and speeds up to 80 mph. They will provide up-to-date amenities 
including year-round temperature controls, better seating and other conveniences 
to satisfy modern travel demands. 



Rail Improvements (LIRR) 

Extension of Electrification $14 

Presently MCTA has under way a federally aided modernization of the existing 
LIRR electrification. This project also extends electrification 6.3 miles on the 
Main Line from Mineola to Hicksville and 9.8 miles on the Port Jefferson Branch 
from Hicksville to Huntington. As part of the first priority program, the electri- 
fication will be further extended from Huntington to Northport (5 miles) on the 
Port Jefferson Branch and from Hicksville to Pinelawn (7.6 miles) on the Main 
Line. In addition, high-level platforms will be constructed at all of the stations 
along the newly electrified routes to permit use of the new cars. 

Purchase of 350 New Cars $84 

Presently MCTA has ordered 270 new high-speed, air-conditioned electric cars 
as the first stage of its equipment modernization program. These cars are under 
construction and are scheduled for delivery in the fall of this year. As part of 
the first priority program, 350 additional cars of identical modern design will be 



Cost 
(millions) 

purchased. This will provide modern, air-conditioned electric car service to all 
stations in the electrified zone including the new extension described above. 
It will permit the Rail Road to discontinue use of all pre-World War II cars in 
the expanded electrified zone. 

Yard and Shop Expansion $60 

To maintain and store the new cars properly and to utilize the newly electrified 
trackage, the LIRR's yard and shop facilities will be expanded. At strategic loca- 
tions throughout the electrified zones, new facilities will be constructed to meet 
these needs. 

Signal Improvements $20 

To permit operation of more trains at faster speeds and with greater safety, a 
highly sophisticated automatic train control system will be installed including 
modernization of interlockings and expansion of centralized traffic control. An 
operations control center will also be provided to improve operating efficiency 
and allow greater flexibility to reduce delays. 

Track Improvements $25 

The new cars being purchased have a much greater performance capability than 
present equipment, including speeds of 100 mph. To best utilize this potential, 
improvements to the track and roadbed will be made throughout the electrified 
zone. 

Jamaica Modernization $13 

Jamaica is presently a bottleneck causing severe speed restrictions, primarily 
because of the need for passengers to change at that point between diesel and 
electrified services. With the new electrification, new electric cars, and possible 
use of dual-powered cars, most commuters can be delivered directly without 
change. Therefore, the trackage at Jamaica will be streamlined to permit all 
trains to operate through this area with greater dispatch. 



Airport Access 

LIRR Service to John F. Kennedy Airport $100 

This proposed link is of vital importance because of its profound effect upon 
the future of the city as an international, commercial, financial and transportation 
hub. 

JFK Airport has become almost impossible to reach by highway in peak periods, 
a situation that will worsen in the coming years. Larger aircraft carrying up to 
500 passengers are scheduled to go into service in the near future and will 
further overtax existing ground transportation facilities. Nearly 20 million pas- 
sengers used Kennedy Airport last year, and this number is expected to double 
by 1975. Further, the airport as an employment center continues to grow in 
importance. There are more than 35,000 jobs at JFK now, and estimates indicate 
this number will double in the next 15 years. 

Construction of a new direct rail link is recommended from the LIRR Atlantic 
Branch, running some three and a half miles to the terminal area, in order to 
insure the continued viability of the airport. This link will permit dependable, fre- 
quent and convenient service from midtown Manhattan (approximately 20 minutes) 
with the additional potential of attracting airport users from Queens, Brooklyn and 
Long Island points via Jamaica. Detailed alignments of this route have not yet 
been determined. However, it appears that the most feasible route that minimizes 



EASTERN CORRIDOR - PHASE ONE 



Cost 
(millions) 

the taking of private property and avoids community disruption is through the 
Baisley Pond Park area. 

A structure of modern architectural design can make this facility completely 
compatible with its surroundings. 




Modern aerial rail structure in a landscaped linear park, San Francisco Bay Area, is example of 
rail design which is compatible with surroundings. 




Transportation Centers 

Development of a Transportation Center at Republic Airport 

The project includes acquisition of Republic and Zahn's Airports and additional 
adjacent lands necessary to maximize the potential for an air-rail-bus-auto-taxi 
transportation center. It is proposed to phase out use of Zahn's as an airport 
so that this site may be developed for an appropriate alternate use. 

Development of the Republic Airport complex will provide one of the finest 
examples of a modern primary general aviation airport and integrated trans- 
portation center in the nation. The need for improved and expanded aviation 
facilities in the New York metropolitan area is well documented. Indeed, part 
of the solution to the region's major commercial jetport needs lies in the develop- 
ment of facilities such as Republic to relieve congestion at the major airports. 

This facility will provide direct mass transportation service to the industrial 
heartland of western Suffolk County, providing an opportunity for excellent rail 
travel to Manhattan as well as reverse commutation. LIRR express running time 
from Manhattan to Republic will be 30 minutes. 

In addition to land acquisition, the project involves improvement of airport 
operations and terminal facilities (for example, navigational and traffic control) 
and multi-modal passenger facilities. It also includes improved access to the 
railroad station from the airport, additional automobile parking space and im- 
proved road access and traffic circulation. 



$25 



25 



EASTERN CORRIDOR 



DESCRIPTION OF PROJECTS 



PHASE TWO 



Transit Expansion 



Cost 
(millions) 



Added Extension of Northeast Queens Subway 



$85 



To meet the continuing growth in outer Queens, the northeast Queens subway 
will be extended from the Queens College-Fresh Meadows area to a terminal at 
Springfield Boulevard. 



The old BMT elevated will be razed in the business district of Jamaica and its 
service incorporated with the new southeastern Queens route. Transit service 
will also be extended east of Jamaica to the vicinity of Hollis. These improve- 
ments are needed for better access to Jamaica, which is expected to grow in 
office, retail and educational activities, and to coordinate the many rapid transit, 
rail, airport access and bus routes converging in Jamaica. Demolition of the 
elevated along Jamaica Avenue will help revitalize the heart of this sub-center. 
These improvements should be coordinated with redevelopment plans for the 
area. 

Additional Air-conditioned Cars $42 

Purchase of 300 new high-speed cars will be required to meet the expansion 
needs of subway lines in this sector. 

Expansion of Yards and Shops $40 

Expanded yard and shop facilities will be required to service the expanded fleet 
and extended systems. 

Rail Improvements (LIRR) 

Extension of Electrification $48 

To complete the electrification program, three additional extensions will be 
undertaken. These are completion of the Port Jefferson Branch from Northport 
to Port Jefferson (18 miles); extension along the Main Line from Pinelawn to 
Ronkonkoma (16 miles); and extension via the Central Branch from Bethpage 
to Patchogue on the Montauk Line (24 miles). High-level station platforms will 
also be constructed at all the newly electrified points to complete the program. 

Purchase of 500 New Cars $123 

Up to 250 new cars of identical design to the 620 already discussed will be 
purchased to serve the newly electrified lines and to provide for future traffic 
growth. In addition, up to 250 new 68-foot long cars capable of operating over 



Jamaica Area Improvements 



$50 



26 EASTERN CORRIDOR - PHASE TWO 



Cost 
(millions) 

the subway system will be purchased to provide for direct access to lower 
Manhattan, as discussed in the Central Business District section of this report. 

Purchase of 150 Dual-powered Cars $55 

New self-propelled equipment will be purchased for present diesel-powered 
territory, preferably dual-powered (e.g., a gas turbine-electric car which can 
serve both electric and non-electric territory) to completely modernize all Long 
Island Rail Road service covering the entire Island. 

System Improvements $45 

Additional improvements will be made to the yards and shops, signal system, 
stations and track to completely develop the potential of the new equipment and 
electrification extensions. 



Transportation Centers 

Three Additional Transportation Centers along the Main Line of the LIRR $25 

A transportation center at Hicksville will serve commuters from as far north as 
Oyster Bay and as far south as Levittown. The present importance of this station 
in the Long Island Rail Road's transportation system, its excellent access and its 
potential as a major suburban center are part of the area's attributes. 

A Pine Aire transportation center will provide express rail service to com- 
muters from the fast growing communities in Huntington, Babylon, Islip and 
Smithtown. Located about seven miles east of Republic, Pine Aire has excellent 
highway access. 

A transportation center at MacArthur Airport in the vicinity of Ronkonkoma is 
proposed to serve the anticipated population growth of central Suffolk. The trib- 
utary area for this center is expected to have the sharpest population increase 
of any section of Long Island. By 1985 it should reach over 250,000. The site 
would be located at MacArthur Airport, an important commercial facility. 

General Aviation $20 

Additional general aviation airports will be required on Long Island to meet 
anticipated aviation demands over the years. MCTA generally endorses the Tri- 
State Transportation Commission's recommendations on general aviation airports 
and proposes the following, recognizing that no specific sites are yet determined: 

■ A limited capacity airport, in Suffolk County, approximately equidistant be- 
tween Republic and MacArthur Airports, will ultimately be needed to relieve the 
proposed Republic Airport of future instructional and recreational flight activities. 

■ A similar limited-use airport will eventually be required in northeast Suffolk to 
relieve anticipated pressures on existing airfields in eastern Long Island. 



NORTHERN CORRIDOR 




NORTHERN CORRIDOR MANHATTAN -BRONX SECTOR 



TRANSIT EXPANSION PROGRAM 

New Rapid Transit Line or Extension 
Existing Line to be Rehabilitated 
Existing Junction to be Reconstructed 
Existing Elevated Line to be Removed 



PHASE 
ONE 



iiiiiiiiii 



PHASE 
TWO 



AVIATION AND TRANSPORTATION CENTERS 



RAIL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 

Existing Rail Line to be Modernized 

and Re-equipped 
Rail Line to be Extended 
Existing Station to be Modernized 

Transportation Center 



PHASE PHASE 
ONE TWO 



£E3 CS3 



o 



Peekskill 




Poughkeepsie 



YORK 



DUTCHESS 



PUTNAM 



Brewster 



Spring \ 
Valley Tar rtown i, r\K\*.\ 

Or^geburg / North ^r~T 

J 

'Rye 



White 
I Plains 
North 



Grand Central 
Terminal 

Penn 
Station 



NORTHERN CORRIDOR 

AVIATION AND TRANSPORTATION 
CENTERS 

Transportation Center 
General Aviation Airport 
General Aviation Airport 

Specific Site Not Determined 




PHASE PHASE 
ONE TWO 



O 



O 



NORTHERN CORRIDOR 



DESCRIPTION OF PROJECTS 
PHASE ONE 



Transit Expansion (millions 

Second Avenue Subway— 63rd Street, Manhattan, to 138th Street, the Bronx $1 

First priority has been given to the construction of the Second Avenue subway 
north from the midtown area to the Bronx, because this section is urgently 
needed to relieve the Lexington Avenue subway and break the East Side bottle- 
neck. This project will provide the added capacity needed for improved rapid 
transit service to the Northern Corridor. It will reduce overcrowding on the Lex- 
ington Avenue and Bronx subway lines and will permit more reliable and faster 
schedules to the outer sections of the northern Bronx. 

In the lower Bronx, the recommended route will be a high-speed express 
bypass built adjacent to the existing Pelham Bay subway under 138th Street. 
The Brook Avenue station will be reconstructed to permit an across-the-platform 
transfer between Second Avenue and Lexington Avenue trains. 

The amount of money indicated for the Second Avenue subway will permit the 
construction of a basic two-track subway, with extra tracks as required for effi- 
cient operation, expandable at some future time to four tracks. An analysis of the 
passenger loads carried on the present subways shows that a two-track facility 
can significantly reduce present overcrowding. The expenditure of the extra 
money — over $200 million — needed to develop a full four-track facility is not 
possible at this time without drastically curtailing the scope of the Queens and 
Brooklyn programs. 

Second Avenue Extension to Dyre Avenue, the Bronx 

The Second Avenue Line will then continue from a portal east of Bruckner 
Boulevard as a two-track, high-speed bypass following the abandoned roadbed 
of the defunct New York, Westchester & Boston Railroad. This route, which will 
be relatively inexpensive to construct, will extend some three miles northward to 
a junction with the Dyre Avenue Line at East 180th Street and the Pelham Bay 
Line at Whitlock Avenue. The Dyre Avenue Line station platforms will be adapted 
to accommodate the new Second Avenue trains. 

As part of this project, the White Plains Road Line will be relocated in the 
vicinity of East 177th Street to eliminate several sharp curves and to achieve 
convenient, across-the-platform transfer between White Plains Road and Second 
Avenue trains at East 180th Street. Thus the upper White Plains Road Line will 
be an effective feeder to the Second Avenue Line, and travel time from East 241st 
Street will be reduced. 

Second Avenue Line Connection to Upper Pelham Line 

The Upper Pelham Bay Line will be incorporated into the Second Avenue Line by 
means of a new connection near Whitlock Avenue. The lower portion of the 



32 NORTHERN CORRIDOR - PHASE ONE 



NHRR CAR REPLACEMENTS 




PRESENT PHASE ONE 

PROGRAM 



PCRR CAR REPLACEMENTS 




PRESENT PHASE ONE 

PROGRAM 



Cost 
(millions) 

Pelham Bay Line will provide improved service in the lower Bronx via the Lex- 
ington Avenue route, while faster service is offered to the Upper Pelham Bay Line 
from the Second Avenue line by using longer stretches of the high-speed route. 
To accommodate wider and longer Second Avenue trains, station platforms must 
be cut back and lengthened. 

Second Avenue trains could alternate between Dyre Avenue and Pelham Bay 
Park terminals. 

149th Street Junction Improvements — 

In addition to Second Avenue subway improvements in the Bronx, we recom- 
mend the reconstruction of the IRT subway junction at 149th Street to eliminate 
slow-speed, hairpin curves used by Lexington Avenue-White Plains Road trains, 
reduce delays, increase system capacity and reduce operating and maintenance 
costs. 

This project could be included as part of the Transit Authority's continuing 
rehabilitation program. 

Air-conditioned Cars $42 

Approximately 300 new high-speed air-conditioned subway cars will be needed 
for service on extensions in upper Manhattan and the Bronx. 

Rail Improvements 

Modernization of New Haven Railroad Commuter Service $43* 

Together with the Connecticut Transportation Authority and using Federal aid 
already granted, the New Haven Railroad commuter service will be secured and 
completely modernized. The program includes purchase of up to 144 new high- 
speed, air-conditioned electric cars similar to those being acquired for the LIRR; 
rehabilitation of 100 existing air-conditioned electric cars; station modernization, 
including all high-level platforms in electrified territory; and modernization of the 
electrification, installation of an automatic train control system and track rehabili- 
tation. The total cost of the bi-state program, including an allowance for possible 
purchase, is $104 million. New York State's share of this is $43 million, which 
would be reduced with the addition of Federal funds, of which $12.4 million has 
already been granted. 
•Includes Federal funds 

Modernization of New York State Portion of 

Penn Central Railroad Commuter Service $80 

To provide modern, air-conditioned electric car service to all of the electrified 
trackage of the Penn Central, 130 new high-speed, air-conditioned electric 
cars like those being purchased for the LIRR will be needed. Electrification will 
be extended 28 miles from North White Plains to Brewster on the Harlem Divi- 
sion, and the electrified system will be modernized to provide for greater per- 
formance capability. High-level platforms will be constructed at all of the stations 
served by the new cars. 

An express third track will be constructed between Mt. Vernon and North 
White Plains to provide high-speed service to the area served by the new elec- 
trification. An automatic train control system — similar to the one proposed for 
the New Haven — will be installed from New York City to Brewster for purposes 
of greater capacity, speed and safety. 

Modernization of the New York State Portion of the Erie Lackawanna Railroad $2 

In conjunction with a similar program now under way by the State of New Jersey, 
it is proposed that New York provide new equipment to modernize the existing 
rail commuter service of the Erie Lackawanna Railroad in Rockland and Orange 
Counties. This line has potential in this growth area of the region. 



NORTHERN CORRIDOR - PHASE ONE 33 



Cost 

(millions) 

It is proposed to study use of dual-powered, self-propelled cars to provide 
future high-speed commuter service from all communities along the Erie Lacka- 
wanna Main Line and the New Jersey and New York branch. It is also proposed 
to study the feasibility of operating this service directly to Pennsylvania Station 
in Manhattan by means of suitable track connections in the vicinity of Secaucus, 
New Jersey. It is assumed the cost of this track connection will be shared by 
the two states. 

Transportation Centers and General Aviation $32 

General Aviation Airport — Northwest Westchester 

Westchester County recently lost an important general aviation facility at 
Armonk due to construction of Interstate Highway Route 87 and relocated Route 
22. A replacement of this facility should be located in northwest Westchester, 
where it could also help serve Putnam County airport needs. Several sites are 
being evaluated by MCTA and Westchester County. The most favorable site lies 
south of Route 6 in northwest Somers. A second site under review having some 
merit would be located partly on filled land just west of the Penn Central Railroad 
at Croton-Harmon. 

Rye 

Provides interchange with New Haven Railroad commuter service, Interstate High- 
ways 95 and 287, and possibly Northeast Corridor rail service between New York 
and Boston. 

White Plains Area 

Provides interchange with Penn Central Harlem Division and Interstate Route 287. 



Tarrytown 

Good access to a transportation center in Tarrytown will be provided via Route 9, 
Interstate 287 and the New York State Thruway. The center will serve west central 
Westchester and some commuters from Rockland. 

Spring Valley 

The central Rockland area, west of the Hudson, will be served by this transporta- 
tion center, which provides interchange between the New Jersey and New York 
branch of the Erie Lackawanna Railroad, Interstate Highway 287, local and 
express bus service to New York. 

A general aviation airport capable of handling the present and future needs of 
Rockland and southern Orange Counties and adjoining areas should be located 
in central Rockland. It should be provided with excellent access to the Spring 
Valley transportation center as well as the area's major highways. 

Pearl River 

The south central sector of Rockland County will be served by a major center for 
rail and express bus service, located at a point where the new State Route 304 
crosses the New Jersey-New York branch of the Erie Lackawanna Railroad, just 
north of the local business district. 




Orangeburg 

The southeastern sector of Rockland County will be served by a highway, bus and 
possibly rail center near the intersection of Route 303 and the Palisades Parkway. 
This center will be near the rights-of-way of the Penn Central and the Erie Lacka- 
wanna Railroads, offering a potential for possible future commuter rail service. 



NORTHERN CORRIDOR 



DESCRIPTION OF PROJECTS 



PHASE TWO 



Transit Expansion 



Cost 
(millions) 



Concourse Line Extension to Northeast Bronx 



$19 



A short 0.6 mile extension of the Concourse subway to a new terminal and trans- 
fer station at White Plains Road is recommended to provide better access to the 
northeast Bronx. The transfer connection to the White Plains Road Line will 
result in better coordination of Bronx transit services and improve travel between 
the east and west Bronx. 

Third Avenue Elevated Replacement $95 

The Third Avenue elevated is a slow, obsolete, blighting structure, much of it 
built before the turn of the century. The present service is a shuttle operation 
which is unsatisfactory, requiring an inconvenient transfer at 149th Street. The 
Third Avenue elevated will be replaced with a modern rapid transit line with 
through service to Manhattan. It is recommended that this be done by con- 
structing extra trackage adjacent to the Penn Central Railroad on Park Avenue. 
The replacement transit route could connect with either the new Second Avenue 
subway or the existing IRT subway. 

Efforts should be undertaken to coordinate this replacement with a renewal 
program to improve the environment of the Third Avenue-Park Avenue corridor. 
This might include covering over the exposed railroad cut. The renewal program 
will require separate financing. 

Extension of Pelham Line to Co-op City $20 

The huge Co-op City development, which will house some 50,000 people, will 
require improved transportation facilities. A direct link to Co-op City is proposed 
by extending the converted Pelham-Second Avenue Line from the present station 
at Pelham Bay Park to a modern terminal located within the housing complex. 

New Air-conditioned Cars $28 

Purchase of 200 high-speed subway cars will be required to serve the major 
transit expansions in the Upper Manhattan-Bronx Area. 



Expansion of Shops and Yards $60 

Expansion of shop and yard facilities will be needed to service the enlarged fleet 
of cars. 



36 NORTHERN CORRIDOR - PHASE TWO 



Cost 
(millions) 

Rail Improvements 

Completion of Modernization of Penn Central Railroad Commuter Service $34 

On the Hudson Division, electrification will be extended to Peekskill; new, high- 
speed electric cars will be purchased, the signal system modernized and a new 
train control system will be installed. Also, the purchase of 25 dual-powered cars 
is required for the remaining non-electrified service. Finally, construction of a 
new subway-rail-bus transportation center at 149th Street in the Bronx is recom- 
mended. 

Completion of Modernization of Erie Lackawanna Railroad (New York portion) $10 

To provide for future growth of the area west of the Hudson, approximately 25 
dual-powered self-propelled cars will be purchased. This will make possible a 
high-speed commuter service from all communities along the Erie Lackawanna 
Main Line and the New Jersey and New York Branch. To permit direct service to 
Penn Station, a new track connection would be required as part of a joint effort 
by the States of New Jersey and New York. 



Transportation Centers $13 
Brewster 

The Brewster transportation center will provide interchange with the Penn Central 
Harlem Division and Interstate Highways 84 and 87. 

New City 

This center will provide bus terminal and related transportation center facilities 
along Route 304, north of the New City business district. 

Beacon 

This will provide interchange with Penn Central Hudson Division and Interstate 84. 
Suffern 

A transportation center in this area will provide interchange between the Main 
Line of the Erie Lackawanna Railroad, Interstate 287, the N.Y. State Thruway, 
and express bus service to New York. 

Goshen 

An interchange between the Main Line of the Erie Lackawanna Railroad, Inter- 
state 84, Route 17 Quickway and bus service to New York will be provided. 

Additional centers as needed 



General Aviation $15 

Additional general aviation airports will be needed to support instructional, 
recreational and limited business activities at existing airports as well as those 
already proposed by MCTA. Such an airport should be provided for southwest 
Dutchess, to serve that county and nearby Putnam County areas. As population 
growth and recreation activities in the northern sector increase, additional air- 
ports may be required. 



SOUTHERN CORRIDOR 



SOUTHERN CORRIDOR 



DESCRIPTION OF PROJECTS 
PHASE ONE 



Cost 
(millions) 

Transit Expansion 

Staten Island Rapid Transit Railway (SIRT) $25 

The SIRT is an electrified, grade-separated rapid transit line extending the full 
14-mile length of Staten Island. The railroad was last modernized and re-equipped 
in 1925, and is in dire need of rehabilitation. The present over-age cars will be 
replaced, the electrical system will be modernized, and improvements to the 
signal system, roadbed and stations will be made. The result will be a modern, 
high-speed, rapid transit line. 

If major investments are made, it will be necessary to secure such capital 
investment by acquiring the line or otherwise insuring its long-term operations. 
The City of New York currently leases the line and subsidizes its operation by the 
private Staten Island Rapid Transit Railway Company — a subsidiary of the 
C&O/B&O railway system. 

Staten Island is the last area within the boundaries of New York City that is 
still relatively undeveloped. Substantial growth is expected over the next few 
decades, with a predicted doubled population and employment by 1985. 




Staten Island Rapid Transit Railway provides the only rapid transit service lor New York City's 
rapidly growing "last frontier." It requires replacement ol obsolete rolling stock and modernized 
equipment. 



SOUTHERN CORRIDOR 



DESCRIPTION OF PROJECTS 



PHASE TWO 



Transit Expansion 



Cost 
(millions) 



Staten Island Rapid Transit Railway (SIRT) 



$10 



It is also proposed to explore the possibility of additional service to meet the 
long-term growth of the Island. Funds will also be needed to purchase new cars 
and facilities. 

In the immediate years ahead, population increases and densities are not 
expected to require major new construction; however, planning will be undertaken 
looking to the future when a high-speed, direct rail tunnel link to Manhattan will 
provide for the needs of this Corridor to the year 2000. 



MANHATTAN CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 



CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 



PHASE 

TRANSIT EXPANSION PROGRAM ONE 

New Rapid Transit Line or Extension 
New Midtown Distribution System 

RAIL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 

Existing Rail Line to be Modernized ^+^4" 

and Re-equipped 
Rail Line to be Extended 
Existing Station to be Modernized 



TRANSPORTATION CENTER 

Transportation Center 



o 



MANHATTAN CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 



DESCRIPTION OF PROJECTS 
PHASE ONE 



Transit Expansion (mSmom) 

Second Avenue Subway, 63rd Street to 34th Street $70 

This section of the Second Avenue subway is needed to provide additional service 
in the growing East Midtown area. It makes available added track capacity neces- 
sary to accommodate the new services from the Bronx and Queens. This will give 
Queens direct access to an East Side route via a connection with the 63rd Street 
tunnel. 

63rd Street Crosstown Connections $130 

A crosstown subway will be constructed under 63rd Street connecting the end of 
the new tunnel at York Avenue with the new 57th Street station of the Sixth 
Avenue subway and to the 57th Street station of the BMT at Seventh Avenue. 

Also included in the project are two connections to the Second Avenue sub- 
way. The southerly one will allow Queens trains to turn south into lower Second 
Avenue. The northerly one will permit Bronx trains to turn west, via' 63rd Street, 
and south into the BMT Broadway-Seventh Avenue subway. The northerly con- 
nection will provide a convenient east-west service, enabling passengers to travel 
between the upper East Side residential areas and the West Side of the midtown 
business district without transfer, and will provide, for the first time, direct access 
to the West Side for riders from the Pelham Bay Line. It will also provide a route 
to lower Manhattan via the BMT line for Second Avenue trains before the Phase 
Two extension of the Second Avenue line to lower Manhattan is constructed. 



Rail Improvements 

New East Midtown Terminal for LIRR $195 

Connections will be provided in Queens to the new 63rd Street tunnel and in 
Manhattan from the tunnel to a new East Midtown terminal for the LIRR under 
Third Avenue in the vicinity of 48th Street. The terminal will be developed as part 
of the Metropolitan Transportation Center, described below. 

Metropolitan Transportation Center — 

It is further proposed to develop a full block in East Midtown Manhattan as a 
Metropolitan Transportation Center, which will not only include the East Side 
terminal of the Long Island Rail Road, but an East Midtown air terminal for high- 
speed access to Kennedy Airport via the Long Island Rail Road and a major inter- 
change point for east-west movement of people via a midtown distribution sys- 
tem proposed for Phase Two. 

The area above the essential floors needed for these purposes and for bus and 



MANHATTAN CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT - PHASE ONE 45 



Cost 
(millions) 

taxi access and parking will be developed for office use. Rental of such space 
will cover the cost and development of the expanded center. 

The center will provide for pedestrian access from the Lexington and Second 
Avenue subways, the Long Island Rail Road, the Penn Central and the New 
Haven Railroads via a new north end access to Grand Central Terminal (dis- 
cussed below) and the midtown distribution system. The center will provide 
facilities for passengers, baggage handling, mail handling, airline ticketing, and 
the like necessary for present day and future air terminal usage. 

From this transportation center, a passenger will be able to check his baggage, 
purchase his ticket and be assured that this will be a scheduled and reliable link 
in his journey. He will be able to travel swiftly and directly to Kennedy Airport 
without bothering about his baggage until he reaches his final destination. 

This center will lessen the demand for JFK Airport terminal and parking facili- 
ties, as many passengers will have already checked in and begun their journey. 

This Metropolitan Transportation Center will result in a more integrated trans- 
portation network, coordinating modernized high-speed railroads, subways, "new 
technology " pedestrian movement and air service. 

Brooklyn Terminal Improvements for LIRR $5 

In preparation for the Phase Two extension of LIRR service to lower Manhattan, 
improvements will be made to the existing facilities to provide for full utilization 
of the new cars and improve the operations. 

Penn Station Improvements for LIRR $6 

These improvements will provide for greater utilization of ten-car trains of the 
new cars at all LIRR platforms to meet the immediate needs of this terminal. 
Future growth projections indicate that this station will always be heavily used. 

North End Access at Grand Central Terminal — 

The Penn Central will be asked to provide north end access in the vicinity of 48th 
Street from the existing station platforms at Grand Central Terminal. This will 
provide a much shorter walk for commuters going north and will also relieve 
crowding and congestion in the existing concourses. 



MANHATTAN CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 



DESCRIPTION OF PROJECTS 



PHASE TWO 



Transit Expansion 



Cost 
(millions) 



Second Avenue Subway, East 34th Street to Whitehall Street 



$115 



The extension of the Second Avenue line southward from a temporary terminal 
at East 34th Street to a new terminal under Water Street near Whitehall Street 
in downtown lower Manhattan will complete the Second Avenue line. It will pro- 
vide a new link between Midtown and Downtown Manhattan, serve the burgeon- 
ing office developments along or near Water Street, accommodate the growing 
East Side residential areas below 34th Street, and provide a fast, direct route to 
lower Manhattan for Queens trains. 

The extension will pass through the Grand Street station of the Chrystie Street 
subway, which will be enlarged, as provided in the design of that station. Pas- 
sengers from the BMT system in Brooklyn will be able to make an across-the- 
platform transfer to Second Avenue trains at Grand Street. Transfer to other 
Brooklyn and crosstown routes will also be possible at Houston Street and at 
14th Street. 

As in the case of the upper Second Avenue line, the money shown is adequate 
to construct a two-track facility, with provision for expansion to four tracks 
north of Grand Street if ever required in the future. 

New Midtown Distribution System $250 

While all of the new access routes will improve delivery to Manhattan, the prob- 
lem still remains of improving circulation within the Central Business District 
itself. This is especially true in mid-Manhattan which is spread out over a wider 
area than the highly concentrated downtown financial district. 

The subway and rail systems serve their functions well as high-capacity, line- 
haul services. However, conventional rail systems cannot fulfill the need for 
relatively short journeys ranging over a span of a few city blocks. On the other 
hand, travel on the surface street network, either by bus or taxi, is slow and often 
barely exceeds walking speeds. A new system is proposed to meet this mid- 
town distribution problem. Technology has now progressed to the point where 
it is feasible to design and develop a system for this purpose. Four linked routes 
on 57th, 48th, 42nd and 33rd Streets are proposed. These will provide easy dis- 
tribution from all of the midtown commuter terminals, both rail and bus, as well 
as interconnect all of the trunk-line subways. 

The type of system envisioned would basically augment the pedestrian func- 
tion. It must be available on a 24-hour-a-day, 7-day-a-week basis without long 
waits for service. The possibility of using high-speed conveyors, small rail cars, 
or some form of automated guided car system, such as was once proposed as a 



MANHATTAN CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT - PHASE TWO 47 



Cost 
(millions) 

replacement for the 42nd Street shuttle, will be investigated, as will an alternative 
approach which would extend the Second Avenue subway across 48th Street to 
a West Side terminal. The new midtown distribution system will expand the area 
served by rapid transit including the presently under-developed western part of 
the area. 



Rail Improvements 

Extension of LIRR Service to Lower Manhattan $65 

Suitable connections from the Brooklyn line of the LIRR into the subway system 
will provide direct service from Long Island to the Wall Street area. This will 
require 250 new cars discussed above, and complete the Long Island Rail Road 
CBD terminal program which will deliver riders more closely to their jobs. 



Complete Penn Station Improvements 

Additional passenger and train facilities will be provided to serve the future 
growth and continued use of this strategically located terminal. 



$11 




Hi iiiiaa 

f 1 1 ■ ■■nno 
I ■ 1 1 1 1 3 □ o 

IIIIIIODI 

(All HUB 

| I ■■■■■ 







PRELIMINARY CONCEPT OF 




METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION CENTER 



ORDER OF MAGNITUDE COST ESTIMATES 



ORDER OF MAGNITUDE COST ESTIMATE 



(Summary By Programs) 




(Cost in millions) 






PHASE 


PHASE 




Program 


One 


Two 


Total 


Transit Expansion 


$ 961 


$ 814 


$1775 


Rail Improvement 


547 


391 


938 


Transportation Centers 


8 


38 


46 


Mass Transit Total 


$1516 


$1243 


$2759 




1 AO 




l o<\ 


Program Total 


$1665 


$1278 


$2943 


(Summary By Corridors) 








EASTERN CORRIDOR 








Transit Expansion 


$ 465 


$ 217 


$ 682 


Rail Improvement 


216 


271 


487 







25 


25 


General Aviation/Airport Access 


125 


20 


145 


Total 


$ 806 


$ 533 


$1339 


NORTHERN CORRIDOR 




Transit Expansion 


$ 271 


$ 222 


$ 493 


Rail Improvement 


125 


44 


169 


Transportation Centers 


8 


13 


21 


General Aviation 


24 


15 


39 


Total 


$ 428 


$ 294 


$ 722 


SOUTHERN CORRIDOR 




Transit Expansion 


$ 25 


$ 10 


$ 35 


Total 


$ 25 


$ 10 


$ 35 


CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 




Transit Expansion 


$ 200 


$ 365 


$ 565 


Rail Improvement 


206 


76 


282 


Total 


$ 406 


$ 441 


$ 847 



53 



ORDER OF MAGNITUDE COST ESTIMATE 

(By Program) (Cost in minions) 

Transit Expansion 

PHASE PHASE 

EASTERN CORRIDOR One^ Two Total 

Queens approach to 63rd Street Tunnel $45 $ — $45 

Additional express track for Queens IND 70 — 70 

New northeast Queens subway line 150 85 235 

New southeast Queens rapid transit line 100 — 100 

Jamaica area improvements, extension of subway service eastward 

and removal of part of BMT El — 50 50 

Nostrand Avenue subway extension to a modern terminal 60 — 60 

New Lots line extension to a modern terminal 12 — 12 

Rogers Avenue junction improvement — 

Additional air-conditioned subway cars 28 42 70 

Expansion of yards and shops — 40 40 

Total Eastern Corridor Transit $465 $217 $682 

NORTHERN CORRIDOR 

Second Avenue subway, 63rd Street to lower Bronx $150 $ — $150 

Second Avenue Extension to Dyre Avenue, Bronx 60 — 60 

Second Avenue Connection to Upper Pelham Line 19 — 19 

Concourse Line Extension to Northeast Bronx — 19 19 

Third Avenue Elevated Replacement — 95 95 

Pelham Extension to Co-op City — 20 20 

149th Street IRT Improvements , * — * 

Air-conditioned subway cars 42 28 70 

Expansion of yards and shops — 60 60 

Total Northern Corridor Transit $271 $222 $493 



"Continuing Transit Authority rehabilitation program 



54 



ORDER OF MAGNITUDE COST ESTIMATE 



(By Program) 

Transit Expansion (cost in minions) 

PHASE PHASE 

SOUTHERN CORRIDOR ^ne_ Two_ Total 
Rehabilitation and re-equipment of the Staten Island 

Rapid Transit Railway (SIRT) Tottenville line $ 25 $ — $ 25 

Additional rehabilitation of the SIRT — 10 10 

Total Southern Corridor Transit $ 25 $ 10 $ 35 

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 

63rd Street crosstown subway including connection to Sixth, 

Seventh and new Second Avenue subways 130 — 130 

Second Avenue subway, 63rd Street to vicinity of E. 34th Street 70 — 70 

Second Avenue subway, E. 34th Street to Whitehall Street — 115 115 

New CBD distribution system in the vicinity of 

33rd, 42nd, 48th and 57th Streets — _ 250 250 

Total CBD Transit Expansion* $200 $365 $565 

*cars, yards and shops included in corridor estimate. 



ORDER OF MAGNITUDE COST ESTIMATE 



(By Program) 



Rail Improvement 




(Cost in millions) 






PHASE 


PHASE 




EASTERN CORRIDOR 


One 


Two 


Total 


Long Island Rail Road Modernization — 








Extension of Electrification and High Level Platforms 








Huntington to Northport, Hicksville to Pinelawn 


$ 14 


$ - 


$ 14 


Northport to Port Jefferson, Pinelawn to Ronkonkoma, 












48 


48 


Subtotal 


$ 14 


$ 48 


$ 62 


New High Speed, Air-conditioned Cars 




350 85' electric cars 


$ 84 


$ - 


$ 84 


250 68' electric cars for lower Manhattan service 




63 


63 


150 gas turbine electric cars for non-electrified territory 




55 


55 


250 85' electric cars for future traffic 




60 


60 


Subtotal 


$ 84 


$178 


$262 


System Improvements 






$ 60 


$ - 


$ 60 


Signal improvements 


20 


20 


40 


Station improvements 




5 


5 


Track improvements 


25 


20 


45 




13 




13 


Subtotal 


$118 


$ 45 


$163 


Total Long Island Rail Road 


$216 


$271 


$487 




$216 


$271 


$487 



55 



ORDER OF MAGNITUDE COST ESTIMATE 



(By Program) 



Rail Improvement 

PHASE 

NORTHERN CORRIDOR One 
New Haven Railroad Modernization 

144 new high-speed electric cars $ 36 

Rehabilitation of 100 existing 1954 electric cars 6 

Station modernization including high-level platforms 9 

Modernization of the electrical system 

including conversion to commercial frequency 9.1 

Improved Shop and Maintenance Facilities 4.2 

Modernization of the signal system; installation of train 

control system; and upgrading of track for higher speeds 15.7 

Total NHRR Modernization Program $ 80 

Acquisition 24 

Total NHRR Program $104 

Total, New Haven Railroad, New York Share $ 43 

Penn Central Railroad Modernization 

130 new high-speed electric cars $30 

Modernization of existing electrical system 12 

Station improvements including high-level platforms 5 

Modernization of Harlem and Hudson Divisions signal 

system and installation of train control system 13 

Extension of electrification to Brewster including 

high-level platforms 12 

Extension of electrification to Peekskill 

including four additional cars — 

25 new high-speed gas turbine-electric 

cars for service in the non-electrified 

territory to Poughkeepsie and Dover Plains — 

New 149th Street Transportation Center — 

Third Track, Mt. Vernon to North White Plains 8 

Total Penn Central Modernization $80 

Erie Lackawanna Railroad Modernization 

Purchase of new equipment to modernize 

service to Port Jervis $ 2 

Direct track connection to Penn Station, 

New York State share, and purchase of 

25 dual-powered, self-propelled cars — 

Total Erie Lackawanna Modernization $ 2 

Total Northern Corridor Rail Improvement Program $125 



(Cost In millions) 
PHASE 

Two 



10 

11 

$34 



$- 

10 
$10 
$44 



Total 

$36 
6 



9.1 
4.2 

15.7 



$43 

$ 30 
12 
7 

19 

12 

5 



10 
11 

8 

$114 



$ 2 



10 
$ 12 
$169 



CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 



Improved CBD Access for LIRR 

New east midtown terminal including 

connections to 63rd Street tunnel $195 

Extension of Brooklyn service to Lower Manhattan 5 

Penn Station improvements 6 

Subtotal $206 

Improved CBD Access for the Northern Corridor 

North end access at Grand Central Terminal 

Subtotal 

Total CBD Rail Improvement Program $206 



$- 
65 
11 

$76 



$76 



$195 
70 

T7 

$282 



$282 



*To be financed by Penn Central Railroad 



56 



ORDER OF MAGNITUDE COST ESTIMATE 

(By Program) 

Transportation Centers (cost in minions) 

PHASE PHASE 

EASTERN CORRIDOR One Two Total 

Hicksville - $10 $10 

Pine Aire — 2 2 

Ronkonkoma — 3 3 

Others - 10 10 

Total Eastern Corridor Transportation Centers — $25 $25 

NORTHERN CORRIDOR 

Rye $3 $- $ 3 

White Plains area 2 — 2 

Tarrytown 1 — 

Brewster — 1 

Beacon — 1 

Suffern — 1 

Goshen — 1 

Pearl River 1 — 

Orangeburg 1 — 

New City — 1 

Additional Centers as needed — 8 8_ 

Total Northern Corridor Transportation Centers $8 $13 $21 



ORDER OF MAGNITUDE COST ESTIMATE 



(By Program) 

General Aviation/Airport Access (cost m minions) 

PHASE PHASE 

EASTERN CORRIDOR One Two Total 

Access to JFK Airport $100 $— $100 

General Aviation Field — Transportation 

Center, Republic Airport, Farmingdale 25 — 25 

General Aviation, new fields 

Eastern and Central Long Island — 20 20 

Total Aviation Eastern Corridor $125 $20 $145 

NORTHERN CORRIDOR 

Northwest Westchester General Aviation Field $12 $— $12 

Spring Valley General Aviation 

Field and Transportation Center 12 — 12 

General Aviation Field — S. W. 

Dutchess County — 15 15 

Total Aviation Northern Corridor $ 24 $15 $ 39